Why Facts Matter: Health, Media and Public Trust

Woman stands indoors.
A conversation with Nina Shapiro, UCLA surgeon and professor. Author of Hype: A Doctor’s Guide to Medical Myths, Exaggerated Claims, and Bad Advice – How to Tell What’s Real and What’s Not Dr. Nina Shapiro, a surgeon, professor at UCLA and author of a 2018 book on navigating consumer health information

Start

October 9, 2018 - 7:00 pm

End

October 9, 2018 - 8:15 pm

Address

1664 N. Virginia St. Reno, Nevada 89557   View map

A conversation with Nina Shapiro, UCLA surgeon and professor.

Author of Hype: A Doctor’s Guide to Medical Myths, Exaggerated Claims, and Bad Advice – How to Tell What’s Real and What’s Not

Dr. Nina Shapiro, a surgeon, professor at UCLA and author of a 2018 book on navigating consumer health information found among medical professionals, in media and elsewhere, will speak at a community forum Oct. 9 from 7 to 8:15 p.m. Sponsored by the Reynolds School of Journalism and coordinated through the Leonard Family Chair in Media Ethics and Writing, the event will be held in the Wells Fargo Auditorium in the Mathewson-IGT Knowledge Center on the University of Nevada, Reno campus.

During the event, Shapiro will talk about the state of information and what can be trusted, with advice and insights for consumers of health and medical information, including myths about superfoods, water consumption and gluten-free foods. Reynolds School professor Caesar Andrews will then conduct a Q&A session with Shapiro about media coverage of health/medicine, marketing and the impact of the internet. The event will also include a period of audience Q&A.

Shapiro’s book, HYPE: A Doctor’s Guide to Medical Myths, Exaggerated Claims and Bad Advice – How to Tell What’s Real and What’s Not, explores information manipulation, dubious interpretations of research and public misunderstanding common on subjects as varied as gluten-free diets, coffee, vitamin supplements, vaccinations, kale, surgical risk factors, GMOs, vaping and homeopathy as a medical care alternative.

She examines the role of the internet, as well as that of mainstream media, in popularizing often conflicting conclusions. Whether the topic is effectiveness of medical treatments,  nutritional value of certain food or the validity of an endless supply of prescribed pills, she brings discerning, science-based scrutiny to bear on various claims. Shapiro, a frequent source of expert commentary in national news coverage of health and medical issues, also shares compelling observations from her years as a leading surgeon and director of pediatric otolaryngology at UCLA.

The Oct. 9 conversation serves the Reynolds School’s mission of exploring why facts matter in various disciplines that intersect with media. The free event is open to the public.

If you require a reasonable accommodation in order to participate in this event, please contact Jessica Fagundes by October 2, 2018, at jfagundes@unr.edu.

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